American's Care of Serious IllnessA state-by-state report card by the Center to Advance Palliative Care demonstrates that access to palliative care remains inadequate for millions of Americans living with serious illness despite continuing growth in the number of U.S. hospitals reporting palliative care programs.

California received a “B” grade in the report.

Scores for the ten most populous states are as follows:

  • Ohio: A (83)
  • New York: B (78)
  • California: B (74)
  • Illinois: B (72)
  • Penn: B (68)
  • Michigan: B (67)
  • North Carolina: B (65)
  • Florida: C (58)
  • Georgia: C (55)
  • Texas: C (43)

Read more about the report card methodology here.

California featured in palliative care report card

Read the California case study on page 21 of the report.

Featured in the report is a case study on California highlighting efforts to increase access to palliative care throughout the state. Noted initiatives include:

  • Gov. Jerry Brown’s Let’s Get Healthy California Task Force, co-chaired by Diana Dooley, Secretary of Health and Human Services, and Don Berwick, MD
  • The work of long-time palliative care champions such as the California HealthCare Foundation, Coalition for Compassionate Care of California, and the Palliative Care Leadership Center at the University of California, San Francisco
  • The passage of SB 1004, a law requiring the Department of Health Care Services (DHCS) to establish standards and provide technical assistance for Medi-Cal (Medicaid) managed-care plans to ensure delivery of palliative care services
  • The launch of the Institute for Palliative Care by the California State University system in an effort to expand the palliative care workforce

To see how all states rank, and to download the report card, visit reportcard.capc.org.

2 Responses to “California gets “B” on Palliative Care Report Card”

  1. Donald Ritt, MD

    I am available to help 40 + years of clinical medicine Board eligible in Palliative Medicine
    Board Certified in Internal Medicine and in GI

    Reply
    • Irene Escobedo

      I am sighing with relief that California is working on this initiative for stronger palliative care; I’ve been trying for a year now to obtain services for my father who began peritoneal dialysis and is suffering from several negative side effects & symptoms. Not all doctors are familiar/educated in the differences between home health and hospice or what’s offered in between; if it’s even available….

      Reply

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